Abstract:
Ongoing evolution and advances in geospatial and cyber technologies have enabled enormous volumes of data from citizens through their offering of volunteered geographic information (VGI). Recently, the value of VGI has increasingly been realized for practical applications rather than being mostly limited to satisfying the intellectual curiosity of the general public. The research and operational communities have been making an earnest effort to understand and assess the authenticity, validity, and uncertainty of volunteered geographic information. Progress towards rendering VGI as a valuable, trustworthy, and usable component for scientific research and practical applications requires development of appropriate reference frameworks, standards, and models for data curation and communication coupled with novel analytical approaches that allow uncertainty assessment and quantification. Examples of the growing utilization of VGI, such as through crowdsourcing, in successfully developing applications relevant to science and also to governance, offer key knowledge and insights into the critical issue of the VGI life cycle. Generalizing from VGI to crowdsourcing would allow us to address some interesting new issues: crowdsourcing updates, corrections, and ground truth; crowdsourcing integration and synthesis; crowdsourcing software and apps; crowdsourcing archiving and preservation. This workshop will provide an opportunity to discuss acquisition, synthesis, integration, use, archiving, ownership, and the place of VGI in workflow. With increasing use, integration, or synthesis of VGI in real-world applications, it is essential to develop a knowledgebase with compilation of lessons learned and examples of best practice.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Budhendra Bhaduri, Steffen Fritz, and Chris Aubrecht

Website: http://www.ornl.gov/sci/gist/workshops/2014/index.shtml

Contact: bhaduribl@ornl.gov

Abstract:
The interaction of indoor and outdoor spaces, how they connect and separate, is an under-researched topic in GIScience. This is true for many aspects, from human behavior and cognitive processes to formal models and location-based services. Seamless navigation, evacuation of people, or services provided by autonomous robots or drones require a model of the surrounding environment, usually a combination of outdoor and indoor spaces. However, moving from indoor to outdoor spaces or vice versa provides a range of physical, cognitive, and technical challenges. This workshop will address these issues, approaching them from an interdisciplinary perspective. We welcome contributions and participants from any area of GIScience who are interested in better understanding and integrating the interface between indoor and outdoor spaces. A particular focus will be on information processing and presentation under time pressure and/or high cognitive load (e.g., in evacuation situations).

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Kai-Florian Richter, Falko Schmid, Seng W. Loke, and Christoph Stahl

Website: http://www.iospaces.eu

Contact: kai-florian.richter@geo.uzh.ch

Abstract:
This workshop aims to serve as a platform to discuss the recent trends in the study of movement and novel methods for analyzing and contextualizing movement data. The workshop's focus is on, but not limited to, topics concerning analysis, modeling, and representation of movement patterns. The workshop will cover research on any types of movement data from different domains such as transportation (e.g., vehicles, pedestrians), movement ecology (e.g. plants, animals), and environmental hazards (e.g. hurricanes, wildfire, oil spills). Examples of topics of particular interest include:

  • Analyzing movement patterns using external influences (e.g. environment, geographic context)
  • Analyzing interactions between moving entities
  • Simulation and agent-based modeling of movement
  • Cross-scale movement pattern analysis
  • Entity behavior as a driver for patterns of movement

A special issue, with the same aims and scope as the workshop, will be published in the International Journal of Geographical Information Science.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Sean C. Ahearn, Maike Buchin, Somayeh Dodge, Jennifer A. Miller, and Robert Weibel

Website: http://blogs.utexas.edu/amd2014/

Contact: jennifer.miller@austin.utexas.edu

Abstract:
Over 20 years since Geographic Information Science was established as a bona fide scientific field of inquiry and with the subsequent explosion of spatial data sources from satellites to sensors and mobile devices, the geographic information universe is rapidly expanding. However, in many respects the nature and structure of this information universe is poorly understood. Traditionally, GIScience research has focused on the relationships between theoretical information models and the geographic phenomena that they are representing. In the Workshop on Geographic Information Observatories 2014 (GIO2014) we would like to explore the idea of expanding GIScience research to empirically examine the structure of the geographic information universe itself. This will ideally support better understanding of this universe and give us new insights into how this information can be utilized. This includes both observational and experimental approaches to science. The GIO2014 workshop will focus on intensive discussions setting a roadmap towards future work on geographic information observatories. We call for two kinds of contributions, full research papers presenting new work in the indicated areas, as well as statements of interest.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Krzysztof Janowicz, Benjamin Adams, Grant McKenzie, and Tomi Kauppinen

Website: http://stko.geog.ucsb.edu/gio2014/

Contact: jano@geog.ucsb.edu

Abstract:
Research on uncertainty, its characterization, and its role in reasoning has a long tradition in the spatial sciences. Opportunities for further research are provided by: (a) the increasing availability of Open Data and data mined from non-traditional sources such as social media; (b) advances in visual analytics. This workshop will discuss and showcase visualization techniques for supporting analysts, theoreticians, researchers, and decision-makers to integrate uncertainty into decision-making and communicating uncertainty inherent in their findings. We will have keynote speakers from the fields of visualization, computer science, and geography presenting at the workshop. Active participation (presentations) in the workshop will be possible for researchers who submit a short paper on current work, relevant and promising in this research area. Presentations will be kept short to allow for time to focus on discussions. Breakout sessions will allow workshop participants to reflect on ongoing research and useful directions this research should attend to.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Jennifer S. Mason, Susanne Bleisch, Alexander Klippel, Stephanie Deitrick, and Aidan Slingsby

Website: http://cognitivegiscience.psu.edu/uncertainty2014/

Contact: jsmith.geog@gmail.com

Abstract:
Eye tracking has become a popular method for investigating research questions related to geographic information science. This includes studies on how people interact with geographic information systems, studies on how space is perceived in decision situations, and using gaze as input mode for geographic human computer interaction. The workshop aims to bring together researchers from different areas who have a common interest in using eye tracking for research questions related to spatial information. The workshop should stimulate the exchange of ideas between the different areas, laying out a road-map for using eye tracking for spatial research. As highlights, the workshop will feature a keynote talk by Andrew Duchowski, Clemson University, and a hands-on outdoor mobile eye tracking session in Vienna.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Peter Kiefer, Ioannis Giannopoulos, Martin Raubal, and Antonio Krüger

Website: http://www.spatialeyetracking.org/

Contact: et4s@spatialeyetracking.org

Abstract:
The workshop aims at bringing together researchers from relevant fields to address research issues of geospatial visual analytics in the multidisciplinary context of GI Science. Geospatial visual analytics has a tendency to emphasize the spatial components of geographic information. At this workshop we encourage approaches that utilize and emphasize the temporal characteristics of geographic information, consider geographic and temporal information at multiple scales, use interactive and dynamic displays in visual analytics. The theme for the workshop is the use of GeoVisual Analytics approaches for exploring and analysing large data sets with spatial and/or temporal components. Original papers are solicited in this area with innovative papers detailing tight integration of visualization, data mining, database processing, optimization and other computational processing particularly encouraged. A special issue of CaGIS is planned as a consequence.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Jason Dykes, Menno-Jan Kraak, Anthony Robinson, and Heidi Schumann

Website: http://geoanalytics.net/GeoVA2014/

Contact: gennady.andrienko@iais.fraunhofer.de

Abstract:
Recent years have seen an increasing interest in using geographic information services such as Location-Based Services (LBS), geographic information retrieval and recommender systems in assisting our daily behavior and decision-making. Context-awareness plays a key role in these systems. This workshop will focus on how context can be modeled and used in geographic information services. The goal is to provide an opportunity for different lines of research within Geographic Information Science dealing with context information and context-awareness in information services and systems to meet and discuss. We aim to gather researchers to discuss the state of the art in this field, as well as to identify and formulate key research questions for the future development of the field.

Format: Half-day (Morning)

Organizers: Jürgen Hahn and Haosheng Huang

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/contextawarenessingis/

Contact: contextawarenessGIS@gmail.com

This workshop has been cancelled

Format: Half-day

Organizers: Monica Wachowicz and Emmanuel Stefanakis

Website: Coming soon

Contact: monicawachowicz@gmail.com, estef@unb.ca

This tutorial has been cancelled

Format: Half-day (Afternoon)

Organizers: Peter Fisher, Cidalia Fonte, and Jan Caha

Website: http://www.geoinformatics.upol.cz/giscience-fuzzy-tutorial/

Contact: cfonte@mat.uc.pt

This tutorial has been cancelled

Format: Half-day (Morning)

Organizers: Marc van Kreveld and Bettina Speckmann

Website: http://www.win.tue.nl/~speckman/GIScience/Tutorial2014.html

Contact: b.speckmann@tue.nl

Abstract:
There is a sea change in geospatial analysis, or GIScience in general, towards better understanding geographic forms and processes, or urban structure and dynamics in particular, based on geographic information. This change is mainly attributed to Web 2.0 technologies and in particular the rise of social media of various kinds, and subsequently large amounts of social media data or volunteered geographic information have been collected for studying human activities in space and over time. This one-day tutorial aims to provide hands-on guidance on scaling or fractal analysis of geographic information based on maximum likelihood estimation, the most robust statistical estimation on power law detection. Furthermore, we attempt to discuss various issues that underlie the scaling or fractal analysis, e.g., How does scaling analysis differ radically from spatial statistics? What are statistical differences between small data and BIG data?

Format: Full-day

Organizer: Bin Jiang

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/giscience2014tutorial/

Contact: bin.jiang@hig.se

Abstract:
A unique feature of this tutorial is the use of Python based software tools for spatial data analysis. Python is an object oriented scripting language that is gaining rapid adoption in the scientific computing and data science communities. To facilitate its adoption within the GIScience community, Rey and Anselin have collaborated on the creation of PySAL: Python Library for Spatial Analysis. Since its initial release in July 2010, PySAL has been downloaded over 20,000 times and is now included in well- known open source scientific data analysis distributions, such as Anaconda. This two-part tutorial will introduce participants to the latest version of PySAL as well as to GeoDaSpace, a GUI application based on PySAL designed for spatial econometric analysis. The first component introduces the basic organization and philosophy of PySAL, with a special focus on exploratory spatial data analysis. In the second part of the tutorial the focus moves to practical spatial regression analysis using GeoDaSpace and the PySAL spreg module.

Format: Full-day

Organizers: Sergio J. Rey and Luc Anselin

Website: Coming soon

Contact: lanselin@gmail.com